• Coding Qualitative Data

    At the end of the module the learner will be expected to be able to: •Discuss the key assumptions of qualitative research and the measurement of empirical phenomena •Describe and evaluate a range of qualitative techniques suitable utilised in applied research •Evaluate the validity, reliability and ethical implications of specific qualitative research strategies •Select appropriate quantitative techniques for particular research questions This session has been developed through the Learning from WOeRK project at Plymouth University and seeks to support learning in the work place. For an overview of all related modules and resources please visit http://cpdoer.net/collections/ This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 UK: Eng...

    published: 28 Sep 2011
  • Qualitative analysis of interview data: A step-by-step guide

    The content applies to qualitative data analysis in general. Do not forget to share this Youtube link with your friends. The steps are also described in writing below (Click Show more): STEP 1, reading the transcripts 1.1. Browse through all transcripts, as a whole. 1.2. Make notes about your impressions. 1.3. Read the transcripts again, one by one. 1.4. Read very carefully, line by line. STEP 2, labeling relevant pieces 2.1. Label relevant words, phrases, sentences, or sections. 2.2. Labels can be about actions, activities, concepts, differences, opinions, processes, or whatever you think is relevant. 2.3. You might decide that something is relevant to code because: *it is repeated in several places; *it surprises you; *the interviewee explicitly states that it is important; *you have ...

    published: 19 May 2013
  • Content Analysis Coding

    published: 10 Jan 2016
  • Excel and Questionnaires: How to enter the data and create the charts

    This is a tutorial on how to enter the results of your questionnaires in Excel 2010. It then shows you how to create frequency tables (using the countif function not the frequency function). The next stage is creating charts.

    published: 14 Feb 2013
  • SPSS - Coding and Labeling Variables

    published: 30 Mar 2012
  • Coding Part 2: Thematic coding

    Thematic coding is one of the most common forms of qualitative data analysis and it is found in grounded theory, several forms of phenomenological analysis and framework analysis. The analyst tries to identify themes, categories or classifications of the data. Passages of the data (commonly an interview transcript) are coded to the themes - that is the passages are tagged or marked with the name of the theme.

    published: 25 Oct 2011
  • Questionnaire_Codes_Data.avi

    This video shows how a codebook can be used to code responses to a questionnaire in a Microsoft Excel worksheet.

    published: 02 Mar 2012
  • Part 1 - Using Excel for Open-ended Question Data Analysis

    Completing data analysis on open-ended questions using Excel. For analyzing multiple responses to an open-ended question see Part 2: https://youtu.be/J_whxIVjNiY Note: Selecting "HD" in the video settings (click on the "gear" icon) makes it easier to view the data entries

    published: 22 Mar 2013
  • A Coder Rambling Ep. 2: Android LiveData

    Learning about Android LiveData. Example https://github.com/fluxtah/Ep2-LiveDataExample Docs https://developer.android.com/topic/libraries/architecture/livedata.html

    published: 07 Jun 2017
  • Representing Numbers and Letters with Binary: Crash Course Computer Science #4

    Please take our PBS Digital Studios Survey! https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/pbsds2017 Today, we’re going to take a look at how computers use a stream of 1s and 0s to represent all of our data - from our text messages and photos to music and webpages. We’re going to focus on how these binary values are used to represent numbers and letters, and discuss how our need to perform operations on larger and more complex values brought us from our 8-bit video games to beautiful Instagram photos, and from unreadable garbled text in our emails to a universal language encoding scheme. Produced in collaboration with PBS Digital Studios: http://youtube.com/pbsdigitalstudios The Latest from PBS Digital Studios: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... We’ve got merch! https://store.dftba.com/collect...

    published: 15 Mar 2017
  • Coding With Python :: Learn API Basics to Grab Data with Python

    Coding With Python :: Learn API Basics to Grab Data with Python This is a basic introduction to using APIs. APIs are the "glue" that keep a lot of web applications running and thriving. Without APIs much of the internet services you love might not even exist! APIs are easy way to connect with other websites & web services to use their data to make your site or application even better. This simple tutorial gives you the basics of how you can access this data and use it. If you want to know if a website has an api, just search "Facebook API" or "Twitter API" or "Foursquare API" on google. Some APIs are easy to use (like Locu's API which we use in this video) some are more complicated (Facebook's API is more complicated than Locu's). More about APIs: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Api Code f...

    published: 12 Feb 2014
  • What is an API?

    What exactly is an API? Finally learn for yourself in this helpful video from MuleSoft, the API experts. https://www.mulesoft.com/platform/api The textbook definition goes something like this: “An application programming interface (API) is a set of routines, protocols, and tools for building software applications. An API expresses a software component in terms of its operations, inputs, outputs, and underlying types. An API defines functionalities that are independent of their respective implementations, which allows definitions and implementations to vary without compromising each other. A good API makes it easier to develop a program by providing all the building blocks. APIs often come in the form of a library that includes specifications for routines, data structures, object clas...

    published: 19 Jun 2015
  • Tutorial: Qualitative Analysis in Word

    This tutorial describes the process of conducting qualitative analysis using Microsoft Word's comment feature and table feature.

    published: 29 Nov 2011
  • Enterprise Programming Tricks For Clean Code

    It is all too easy to dismiss problematic codebases on some nebulous idea of bad practice or bad programmers. Poor code, however, is rarely arbitrary and random in its structure or formulation. Systems of code, well or poorly structured, emerge from systems of practice, whether effective or ineffective. To improve code quality, it makes more sense to pick apart the specific practices and see their interplay — the cause — than to simply focus on the code itself — the effect. This talk looks at how a handful of coding habits, design practices and assumptions can systematically balloon code and compound its accidental complexity. EVENT: code::dive conference, Poland, 2016 (http://codedive.pl/#) SPEAKER: Kevlin Henney PERMISSIONS: The original video was published on the code::dive YouTube c...

    published: 03 Sep 2017
  • Meet The Coder: Salis

    In GO-JEK, we don't only hire the best people from reputable universities, but we also welcome anyone with immense passion to learn. Watch this video and visit: go-jek.com/career for those who want to join with us!

    published: 14 Mar 2017
  • What Does Coding Looks Like?: Qualitative Research Methods

    You may be told that you need to "code" some qualitative data like interview transcripts, photos, or audio clips, but what does coding look like? We give you the basics. See our other modules on many related topics at Mod-U: https://modu.ssri.duke.edu

    published: 01 Nov 2016
  • Zafar Abbas Data Coder

    Zafar Abbas Data Coder CMP Lahore

    published: 19 Sep 2009
  • 🐍🎓 Algorithms and Data Structures Knowledge to Get a Python Job?

    https://dbader.org/python-tricks ► Dive into Python data structures with simple code examples How much Computer Science data structures and algorithms knowledge do you need to get a job as a Python coder? This is what we're going to talk about in this video. Here's the original question I received from a dbader.org reader: ~~ What is the minimum Data Structures and Algorithms knowledge I can get away with? In my work as QA I rarely used any linked lists or graphs or algorithmic approaches. Though I love writing Python code and learning the language but I am very bad at Maths, DS & Algorithms and Competitive Programming ~~ Got questions about getting your first job as a Python coder? How you should prepare for your first coding interview? Leave a comment below and I'll try to cover ...

    published: 09 Aug 2017
  • The Try Guys Try Coding With Girls Who Code

    “We’re doin’ lines… of code.” Check out more awesome videos at BuzzFeedVideo! http://bit.ly/YTbuzzfeedvideo MUSIC Super Power Up Licensed via Warner Chappell Production Music Inc. SFX provided by Audioblocks.  (https://www.Audioblocks.com) Made by BFMP www.buzzfeed.com/videoteam + Girls Who Code - http://girlswhocode.com/ STILLS Thinkstock media Matrix background Credit: badmanproduction Abstract vector green data flowing technology background Credit: shuoshu SOURCES http://girlswhocode.com/ GET MORE BUZZFEED: www.buzzfeed.com/videoteam www.facebook.com/buzzfeedvideo www.instagram.com/buzzfeedvideo www.buzzfeed.com/video www.youtube.com/buzzfeedvideo www.youtube.com/buzzfeedyellow www.youtube.com/buzzfeedblue www.youtube.com/buzzfeedviolet BUZZFEED VIDEO BuzzFeed Motion Picture’s...

    published: 03 Oct 2015
  • NVivo 10 Coding

    This video demonstrates some ways to use NVivo10 qualitative data analysis software to create "nodes" (categories) and to code to those nodes.

    published: 11 Oct 2012
  • Learn to Code - Lesson 01 - Variables and Basic Data Types

    We'll be bringing you four lessons this week to teach you how to code. This is the first: a look at variables and basic data types. In future lessons we'll be looking at how to use these variables, creating more complex data types and logic statements, and bringing it all together to make a simple guessing game. Be sure to check out all the lessons: http://lifehacker.com/5736011/learn-how-to-code-part-i-variables-and-basic-data-types http://lifehacker.com/5742493/learn-to-code-part-ii-working-with-variables http://lifehacker.com/5742494/learn-to-code-part-iii-arrays-and-logic-statements http://lifehacker.com/5742495/learn-to-code-part-iv-understanding-functions-and-making-a-guessing-game

    published: 24 Jan 2011
  • HOYA PPC DATA CODER (hot goddess).3GP

    published: 08 Sep 2011
  • What is Pulse Code Modulation (PCM)

    http://www.fiberoptics4sale.com/wordpress/what-is-pulse-code-modulation-pcm/ http://www.fiberoptics4sale.com/wordpress/ In a brief sentence, pulse code modulation is a method used to convert an analog signal into a digital signal. So that it can be transmitted through a digital communication network, and then converted back into the original analog signal. The PCM process includes three steps: Sampling, Quantization, and Coding. In the sampling process, the magnitude of the analog signal is sampled regularly at uniform intervals. The obtained values are called samples. For a 4 kHz voice channel, the sampling rate is 8000 Hz, which means the signal is sampled 8000 times per second. The samples will then be converted to digital numbers as we will see in the quantization pro...

    published: 08 Dec 2011
  • Information Theory And Coding - Convolutional Codes

    Information Theory And Coding.

    published: 08 Dec 2015
developed with YouTube
Coding Qualitative Data

Coding Qualitative Data

  • Order:
  • Duration: 6:41
  • Updated: 28 Sep 2011
  • views: 63719
videos
At the end of the module the learner will be expected to be able to: •Discuss the key assumptions of qualitative research and the measurement of empirical phenomena •Describe and evaluate a range of qualitative techniques suitable utilised in applied research •Evaluate the validity, reliability and ethical implications of specific qualitative research strategies •Select appropriate quantitative techniques for particular research questions This session has been developed through the Learning from WOeRK project at Plymouth University and seeks to support learning in the work place. For an overview of all related modules and resources please visit http://cpdoer.net/collections/ This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 UK: England & Wales License
https://wn.com/Coding_Qualitative_Data
Qualitative analysis of interview data: A step-by-step guide

Qualitative analysis of interview data: A step-by-step guide

  • Order:
  • Duration: 6:51
  • Updated: 19 May 2013
  • views: 487584
videos
The content applies to qualitative data analysis in general. Do not forget to share this Youtube link with your friends. The steps are also described in writing below (Click Show more): STEP 1, reading the transcripts 1.1. Browse through all transcripts, as a whole. 1.2. Make notes about your impressions. 1.3. Read the transcripts again, one by one. 1.4. Read very carefully, line by line. STEP 2, labeling relevant pieces 2.1. Label relevant words, phrases, sentences, or sections. 2.2. Labels can be about actions, activities, concepts, differences, opinions, processes, or whatever you think is relevant. 2.3. You might decide that something is relevant to code because: *it is repeated in several places; *it surprises you; *the interviewee explicitly states that it is important; *you have read about something similar in reports, e.g. scientific articles; *it reminds you of a theory or a concept; *or for some other reason that you think is relevant. You can use preconceived theories and concepts, be open-minded, aim for a description of things that are superficial, or aim for a conceptualization of underlying patterns. It is all up to you. It is your study and your choice of methodology. You are the interpreter and these phenomena are highlighted because you consider them important. Just make sure that you tell your reader about your methodology, under the heading Method. Be unbiased, stay close to the data, i.e. the transcripts, and do not hesitate to code plenty of phenomena. You can have lots of codes, even hundreds. STEP 3, decide which codes are the most important, and create categories by bringing several codes together 3.1. Go through all the codes created in the previous step. Read them, with a pen in your hand. 3.2. You can create new codes by combining two or more codes. 3.3. You do not have to use all the codes that you created in the previous step. 3.4. In fact, many of these initial codes can now be dropped. 3.5. Keep the codes that you think are important and group them together in the way you want. 3.6. Create categories. (You can call them themes if you want.) 3.7. The categories do not have to be of the same type. They can be about objects, processes, differences, or whatever. 3.8. Be unbiased, creative and open-minded. 3.9. Your work now, compared to the previous steps, is on a more general, abstract level. 3.10. You are conceptualizing your data. STEP 4, label categories and decide which are the most relevant and how they are connected to each other 4.1. Label the categories. Here are some examples: Adaptation (Category) Updating rulebook (sub-category) Changing schedule (sub-category) New routines (sub-category) Seeking information (Category) Talking to colleagues (sub-category) Reading journals (sub-category) Attending meetings (sub-category) Problem solving (Category) Locate and fix problems fast (sub-category) Quick alarm systems (sub-category) 4.2. Describe the connections between them. 4.3. The categories and the connections are the main result of your study. It is new knowledge about the world, from the perspective of the participants in your study. STEP 5, some options 5.1. Decide if there is a hierarchy among the categories. 5.2. Decide if one category is more important than the other. 5.3. Draw a figure to summarize your results. STEP 6, write up your results 6.1. Under the heading Results, describe the categories and how they are connected. Use a neutral voice, and do not interpret your results. 6.2. Under the heading Discussion, write out your interpretations and discuss your results. Interpret the results in light of, for example: *results from similar, previous studies published in relevant scientific journals; *theories or concepts from your field; *other relevant aspects. STEP 7 Ending remark This tutorial showed how to focus on segments in the transcripts and how to put codes together and create categories. However, it is important to remember that it is also OK not to divide the data into segments. Narrative analysis of interview transcripts, for example, does not rely on the fragmentation of the interview data. (Narrative analysis is not discussed in this tutorial.) Further, I have assumed that your task is to make sense of a lot of unstructured data, i.e. that you have qualitative data in the form of interview transcripts. However, remember that most of the things I have said in this tutorial are basic, and also apply to qualitative analysis in general. You can use the steps described in this tutorial to analyze: *notes from participatory observations; *documents; *web pages; *or other types of qualitative data. STEP 8 Suggested reading Alan Bryman's book: 'Social Research Methods' published by Oxford University Press. Steinar Kvale's and Svend Brinkmann's book 'InterViews: Learning the Craft of Qualitative Research Interviewing' published by SAGE. Good luck with your study. Text and video (including audio) © Kent Löfgren, Sweden
https://wn.com/Qualitative_Analysis_Of_Interview_Data_A_Step_By_Step_Guide
Content Analysis Coding

Content Analysis Coding

  • Order:
  • Duration: 11:16
  • Updated: 10 Jan 2016
  • views: 83015
videos
https://wn.com/Content_Analysis_Coding
Excel and Questionnaires: How to enter the data and create the charts

Excel and Questionnaires: How to enter the data and create the charts

  • Order:
  • Duration: 14:37
  • Updated: 14 Feb 2013
  • views: 274879
videos
This is a tutorial on how to enter the results of your questionnaires in Excel 2010. It then shows you how to create frequency tables (using the countif function not the frequency function). The next stage is creating charts.
https://wn.com/Excel_And_Questionnaires_How_To_Enter_The_Data_And_Create_The_Charts
SPSS - Coding and Labeling Variables

SPSS - Coding and Labeling Variables

  • Order:
  • Duration: 4:57
  • Updated: 30 Mar 2012
  • views: 53220
videos
https://wn.com/Spss_Coding_And_Labeling_Variables
Coding Part 2: Thematic coding

Coding Part 2: Thematic coding

  • Order:
  • Duration: 6:45
  • Updated: 25 Oct 2011
  • views: 140670
videos
Thematic coding is one of the most common forms of qualitative data analysis and it is found in grounded theory, several forms of phenomenological analysis and framework analysis. The analyst tries to identify themes, categories or classifications of the data. Passages of the data (commonly an interview transcript) are coded to the themes - that is the passages are tagged or marked with the name of the theme.
https://wn.com/Coding_Part_2_Thematic_Coding
Questionnaire_Codes_Data.avi

Questionnaire_Codes_Data.avi

  • Order:
  • Duration: 8:52
  • Updated: 02 Mar 2012
  • views: 19239
videos
This video shows how a codebook can be used to code responses to a questionnaire in a Microsoft Excel worksheet.
https://wn.com/Questionnaire_Codes_Data.Avi
Part 1 - Using Excel for Open-ended Question Data Analysis

Part 1 - Using Excel for Open-ended Question Data Analysis

  • Order:
  • Duration: 14:02
  • Updated: 22 Mar 2013
  • views: 119096
videos
Completing data analysis on open-ended questions using Excel. For analyzing multiple responses to an open-ended question see Part 2: https://youtu.be/J_whxIVjNiY Note: Selecting "HD" in the video settings (click on the "gear" icon) makes it easier to view the data entries
https://wn.com/Part_1_Using_Excel_For_Open_Ended_Question_Data_Analysis
A Coder Rambling Ep. 2: Android LiveData

A Coder Rambling Ep. 2: Android LiveData

  • Order:
  • Duration: 7:16
  • Updated: 07 Jun 2017
  • views: 663
videos
Learning about Android LiveData. Example https://github.com/fluxtah/Ep2-LiveDataExample Docs https://developer.android.com/topic/libraries/architecture/livedata.html
https://wn.com/A_Coder_Rambling_Ep._2_Android_Livedata
Representing Numbers and Letters with Binary: Crash Course Computer Science #4

Representing Numbers and Letters with Binary: Crash Course Computer Science #4

  • Order:
  • Duration: 10:46
  • Updated: 15 Mar 2017
  • views: 356876
videos
Please take our PBS Digital Studios Survey! https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/pbsds2017 Today, we’re going to take a look at how computers use a stream of 1s and 0s to represent all of our data - from our text messages and photos to music and webpages. We’re going to focus on how these binary values are used to represent numbers and letters, and discuss how our need to perform operations on larger and more complex values brought us from our 8-bit video games to beautiful Instagram photos, and from unreadable garbled text in our emails to a universal language encoding scheme. Produced in collaboration with PBS Digital Studios: http://youtube.com/pbsdigitalstudios The Latest from PBS Digital Studios: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... We’ve got merch! https://store.dftba.com/collections/crashcourse Want to know more about Carrie Anne? https://about.me/carrieannephilbin Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashC... Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
https://wn.com/Representing_Numbers_And_Letters_With_Binary_Crash_Course_Computer_Science_4
Coding With Python :: Learn API Basics to Grab Data with Python

Coding With Python :: Learn API Basics to Grab Data with Python

  • Order:
  • Duration: 19:23
  • Updated: 12 Feb 2014
  • views: 286677
videos
Coding With Python :: Learn API Basics to Grab Data with Python This is a basic introduction to using APIs. APIs are the "glue" that keep a lot of web applications running and thriving. Without APIs much of the internet services you love might not even exist! APIs are easy way to connect with other websites & web services to use their data to make your site or application even better. This simple tutorial gives you the basics of how you can access this data and use it. If you want to know if a website has an api, just search "Facebook API" or "Twitter API" or "Foursquare API" on google. Some APIs are easy to use (like Locu's API which we use in this video) some are more complicated (Facebook's API is more complicated than Locu's). More about APIs: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Api Code from the video: http://pastebin.com/tFeFvbXp If you want to learn more about using APIs with Django, learn at http://CodingForEntrepreneurs.com for just $25/month. We apply what we learn here into a Django web application in the GeoLocator project. The Try Django Tutorial Series is designed to help you get used to using Django in building a basic landing page (also known as splash page or MVP landing page) so you can collect data from potential users. Collecting this data will prove as verification (or validation) that your project is worth building. Furthermore, we also show you how to implement a Paypal Button so you can also accept payments. Django is awesome and very simple to get started. Step-by-step tutorials are to help you understand the workflow, get you started doing something real, then it is our goal to have you asking questions... "Why did I do X?" or "How would I do Y?" These are questions you wouldn't know to ask otherwise. Questions, after all, lead to answers. View all my videos: http://bit.ly/1a4Ienh Get Free Stuff with our Newsletter: http://eepurl.com/NmMcr The Coding For Entrepreneurs newsletter and get free deals on premium Django tutorial classes, coding for entrepreneurs courses, web hosting, marketing, and more. Oh yeah, it's free: A few ways to learn: Coding For Entrepreneurs: https://codingforentrepreneurs.com (includes free projects and free setup guides. All premium content is just $25/mo). Includes implementing Twitter Bootstrap 3, Stripe.com, django south, pip, django registration, virtual environments, deployment, basic jquery, ajax, and much more. On Udemy: Bestselling Udemy Coding for Entrepreneurs Course: https://www.udemy.com/coding-for-entrepreneurs/?couponCode=youtubecfe49 (reg $99, this link $49) MatchMaker and Geolocator Course: https://www.udemy.com/coding-for-entrepreneurs-matchmaker-geolocator/?couponCode=youtubecfe39 (advanced course, reg $75, this link: $39) Marketplace & Dail Deals Course: https://www.udemy.com/coding-for-entrepreneurs-marketplace-daily-deals/?couponCode=youtubecfe39 (advanced course, reg $75, this link: $39) Free Udemy Course (40k+ students): https://www.udemy.com/coding-for-entrepreneurs-basic/ Fun Fact! This Course was Funded on Kickstarter: http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/jmitchel3/coding-for-entrepreneurs
https://wn.com/Coding_With_Python_Learn_Api_Basics_To_Grab_Data_With_Python
What is an API?

What is an API?

  • Order:
  • Duration: 3:25
  • Updated: 19 Jun 2015
  • views: 1090544
videos
What exactly is an API? Finally learn for yourself in this helpful video from MuleSoft, the API experts. https://www.mulesoft.com/platform/api The textbook definition goes something like this: “An application programming interface (API) is a set of routines, protocols, and tools for building software applications. An API expresses a software component in terms of its operations, inputs, outputs, and underlying types. An API defines functionalities that are independent of their respective implementations, which allows definitions and implementations to vary without compromising each other. A good API makes it easier to develop a program by providing all the building blocks. APIs often come in the form of a library that includes specifications for routines, data structures, object classes, and variables. In other cases, notably SOAP and REST services, an API is simply a specification of remote calls exposed to the API consumers. An API specification can take many forms, including an International Standard, such as POSIX, vendor documentation, such as the Microsoft Windows API, or the libraries of a programming language, e.g., the Standard Template Library in C++ or the Java APIs. An API differs from an application binary interface (ABI) in that an API is source code-based while an ABI is a binary interface. For instance POSIX is an API, while the Linux Standard Base provides an ABI”. To speak plainly, an API is the messenger that runs and delivers your request to the provider you’re requesting it from, and then delivers the response back to you. To give you a familiar example, think of an API as a waiter in a restaurant. Imagine you’re sitting at the table with a menu of choices to order from, and the kitchen is the provider who will fulfill your order. What’s missing is the critical link to communicate your order to the kitchen and deliver your food back to your table. That’s where the waiter (or API) comes in. ”AHEM” The waiter takes your order, delivers it to the kitchen, and then delivers the food (or response) back to you. (Hopefully without letting your order crash if designed correctly) Now that we’ve whetted your appetite, let’s apply this to a real API example. In keeping with our theme, let’s book a flight to a culinary capital – Paris. You’re probably familiar with the process of searching for airline flights online. Just like at a restaurant, you have a menu of options to choose from ( a dropdown menu in this case). You choose a departure city and date, a return city and date, cabin class, and other variables (like meal or seating, baggage or pet requests) In order to book your flight, you interact with the airline’s website to access the airline’s database to see if any seats are available on those dates, and what the cost might be based on certain variables. But, what if you are not using the airline’s website, which has direct access to the information? What if you are using online travel service that aggregates information from many different airlines? Just like a human interacts with the airline’s website to get that information, an application interacts with the airline’s API. The API is the interface that, like your helpful waiter, runs and and delivers the data from that online travel service to the airline’s systems over the Internet. It also then takes the airline’s response to your request and delivers right back to the online travel service . And through each step of the process it facilitates that interaction between the travel service and the airline’s systems - from seat selection to payment and booking. So now you can see that it’s APIs that make it possible for us all to use travel sites. They interface with with airlines’ APIs to gather information in order to present options back to us The same goes for all interactions between applications, data and devices - they all have API’s that allow computers to operate them, and that's what ultimately creates connectivity. API’s provide a standard way of accessing any application, data or device whether it is shopping from your phone, or accessing cloud applications at work. So, whenever you think of an API, just think of it as your waiter running back and forth between applications, databases and devices to deliver data and create the connectivity that puts the world at our fingertips. And whenever you think of creating an API, think MuleSoft.
https://wn.com/What_Is_An_Api
Tutorial: Qualitative Analysis in Word

Tutorial: Qualitative Analysis in Word

  • Order:
  • Duration: 14:27
  • Updated: 29 Nov 2011
  • views: 48025
videos
This tutorial describes the process of conducting qualitative analysis using Microsoft Word's comment feature and table feature.
https://wn.com/Tutorial_Qualitative_Analysis_In_Word
Enterprise Programming Tricks For Clean Code

Enterprise Programming Tricks For Clean Code

  • Order:
  • Duration: 56:09
  • Updated: 03 Sep 2017
  • views: 55017
videos
It is all too easy to dismiss problematic codebases on some nebulous idea of bad practice or bad programmers. Poor code, however, is rarely arbitrary and random in its structure or formulation. Systems of code, well or poorly structured, emerge from systems of practice, whether effective or ineffective. To improve code quality, it makes more sense to pick apart the specific practices and see their interplay — the cause — than to simply focus on the code itself — the effect. This talk looks at how a handful of coding habits, design practices and assumptions can systematically balloon code and compound its accidental complexity. EVENT: code::dive conference, Poland, 2016 (http://codedive.pl/#) SPEAKER: Kevlin Henney PERMISSIONS: The original video was published on the code::dive YouTube channel (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCU0Rt8VHO5-YNQXwIjkf-1g). The conference organizers provided Coding Tech with the permission to republish this video.
https://wn.com/Enterprise_Programming_Tricks_For_Clean_Code
Meet The Coder: Salis

Meet The Coder: Salis

  • Order:
  • Duration: 3:14
  • Updated: 14 Mar 2017
  • views: 6631
videos
In GO-JEK, we don't only hire the best people from reputable universities, but we also welcome anyone with immense passion to learn. Watch this video and visit: go-jek.com/career for those who want to join with us!
https://wn.com/Meet_The_Coder_Salis
What Does Coding Looks Like?: Qualitative Research Methods

What Does Coding Looks Like?: Qualitative Research Methods

  • Order:
  • Duration: 4:43
  • Updated: 01 Nov 2016
  • views: 8969
videos
You may be told that you need to "code" some qualitative data like interview transcripts, photos, or audio clips, but what does coding look like? We give you the basics. See our other modules on many related topics at Mod-U: https://modu.ssri.duke.edu
https://wn.com/What_Does_Coding_Looks_Like_Qualitative_Research_Methods
Zafar Abbas Data Coder

Zafar Abbas Data Coder

  • Order:
  • Duration: 0:07
  • Updated: 19 Sep 2009
  • views: 18
videos
Zafar Abbas Data Coder CMP Lahore
https://wn.com/Zafar_Abbas_Data_Coder
🐍🎓 Algorithms and Data Structures Knowledge to Get a Python Job?

🐍🎓 Algorithms and Data Structures Knowledge to Get a Python Job?

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  • Duration: 16:15
  • Updated: 09 Aug 2017
  • views: 5746
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https://dbader.org/python-tricks ► Dive into Python data structures with simple code examples How much Computer Science data structures and algorithms knowledge do you need to get a job as a Python coder? This is what we're going to talk about in this video. Here's the original question I received from a dbader.org reader: ~~ What is the minimum Data Structures and Algorithms knowledge I can get away with? In my work as QA I rarely used any linked lists or graphs or algorithmic approaches. Though I love writing Python code and learning the language but I am very bad at Maths, DS & Algorithms and Competitive Programming ~~ Got questions about getting your first job as a Python coder? How you should prepare for your first coding interview? Leave a comment below and I'll try to cover your question in one of my upcoming videos. Also check out these related tutorials on dbader.org: - Fundamental data structures in Python: https://dbader.org/blog/fundamental-data-structures-in-python - How to prepare for a Python coding interview: https://dbader.org/blog/how-to-prepare-for-a-python-coding-interview FREE COURSE – "5 Thoughts on Mastering Python" https://dbader.org/python-mastery SUBSCRIBE TO THIS CHANNEL: https://dbader.org/youtube * * * ► Python Developer MUGS, T-SHIRTS & MORE: https://nerdlettering.com ► PythonistaCafe – A peer-to-peer learning community for Python developers: https://www.pythonistacafe.com FREE Python Coding Tutorials & News: » Python Tutorials: https://dbader.org » Python News on Twitter: https://twitter.com/@dbader_org » Weekly Tips for Pythonistas: https://dbader.org/newsletter » Subscribe to this channel: https://dbader.org/youtube
https://wn.com/🐍🎓_Algorithms_And_Data_Structures_Knowledge_To_Get_A_Python_Job
The Try Guys Try Coding With Girls Who Code

The Try Guys Try Coding With Girls Who Code

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  • Duration: 4:48
  • Updated: 03 Oct 2015
  • views: 5958252
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“We’re doin’ lines… of code.” Check out more awesome videos at BuzzFeedVideo! http://bit.ly/YTbuzzfeedvideo MUSIC Super Power Up Licensed via Warner Chappell Production Music Inc. SFX provided by Audioblocks.  (https://www.Audioblocks.com) Made by BFMP www.buzzfeed.com/videoteam + Girls Who Code - http://girlswhocode.com/ STILLS Thinkstock media Matrix background Credit: badmanproduction Abstract vector green data flowing technology background Credit: shuoshu SOURCES http://girlswhocode.com/ GET MORE BUZZFEED: www.buzzfeed.com/videoteam www.facebook.com/buzzfeedvideo www.instagram.com/buzzfeedvideo www.buzzfeed.com/video www.youtube.com/buzzfeedvideo www.youtube.com/buzzfeedyellow www.youtube.com/buzzfeedblue www.youtube.com/buzzfeedviolet BUZZFEED VIDEO BuzzFeed Motion Picture’s flagship channel. Sometimes funny, sometimes serious, always shareable. New videos posted daily! Subscribe to BuzzFeedVideo today! http://bit.ly/YTbuzzfeedvideo
https://wn.com/The_Try_Guys_Try_Coding_With_Girls_Who_Code
NVivo 10 Coding

NVivo 10 Coding

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  • Duration: 6:15
  • Updated: 11 Oct 2012
  • views: 115272
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This video demonstrates some ways to use NVivo10 qualitative data analysis software to create "nodes" (categories) and to code to those nodes.
https://wn.com/Nvivo_10_Coding
Learn to Code - Lesson 01 - Variables and Basic Data Types

Learn to Code - Lesson 01 - Variables and Basic Data Types

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  • Duration: 6:33
  • Updated: 24 Jan 2011
  • views: 542282
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We'll be bringing you four lessons this week to teach you how to code. This is the first: a look at variables and basic data types. In future lessons we'll be looking at how to use these variables, creating more complex data types and logic statements, and bringing it all together to make a simple guessing game. Be sure to check out all the lessons: http://lifehacker.com/5736011/learn-how-to-code-part-i-variables-and-basic-data-types http://lifehacker.com/5742493/learn-to-code-part-ii-working-with-variables http://lifehacker.com/5742494/learn-to-code-part-iii-arrays-and-logic-statements http://lifehacker.com/5742495/learn-to-code-part-iv-understanding-functions-and-making-a-guessing-game
https://wn.com/Learn_To_Code_Lesson_01_Variables_And_Basic_Data_Types
HOYA PPC DATA CODER (hot goddess).3GP

HOYA PPC DATA CODER (hot goddess).3GP

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  • Duration: 6:17
  • Updated: 08 Sep 2011
  • views: 73
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https://wn.com/Hoya_Ppc_Data_Coder_(Hot_Goddess).3Gp
What is Pulse Code Modulation (PCM)

What is Pulse Code Modulation (PCM)

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  • Duration: 6:00
  • Updated: 08 Dec 2011
  • views: 177183
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http://www.fiberoptics4sale.com/wordpress/what-is-pulse-code-modulation-pcm/ http://www.fiberoptics4sale.com/wordpress/ In a brief sentence, pulse code modulation is a method used to convert an analog signal into a digital signal. So that it can be transmitted through a digital communication network, and then converted back into the original analog signal. The PCM process includes three steps: Sampling, Quantization, and Coding. In the sampling process, the magnitude of the analog signal is sampled regularly at uniform intervals. The obtained values are called samples. For a 4 kHz voice channel, the sampling rate is 8000 Hz, which means the signal is sampled 8000 times per second. The samples will then be converted to digital numbers as we will see in the quantization process. Quantization is the process of converting the obtained samples into discrete digital values. The most basic type of quantization is called uniform quantization. In an uniform quantization, the vertical axis, which represents the amplitude, is divided into equal sized steps. As shown in this figure, the range between 1 volt and -1 volt is divided into 16 steps, each step represents 0.125 volt. All the samples whose amplitude falls within an step, take the same step value. However, the quantization process introduces an error. This is because that the real amplitude of a sample is replaced by an approximate value. This error is called quantization noise or quantization distortion. In uniform quantization, the quantization distortion presents a problem. For example, let's assume a quantization error of 0.05 volt, if this happens at a high level signal, such as 5 volt, the noise ratio is 0.05 volt divided by 5 volt, which is 1%, not too bad. But if the same quantization error happens at a low level signal, such as 0.5 volt, the noise ratio is 0.05 volt divided by 0.5 volt, which is 10%. Simply put, for uniform quantization, the signal to noise ratio is good at high level signals, but bad at low level signals. That is why non-uniform quantization was introduced. In non-uniform quantization process, the steps are not of equal size. Small steps are used for small signal values and large steps for large values. The purpose of doing so is to achieve that the signal-to-noise ratio is nearly independent of the signal level. This is done by favoring low-level voice over higher-level voice. In other words, more code groups are assigned to speech at low levels than at the higher levels, progressively more as the level reduces. This is shown in this figure. There are two types of non-uniform quantization methods in popular use today. They are the A-law and the u-law. Let's first look at the A-law. A law follows the logarithmic formula listed here, with A equals to 87.6. We can see that the curve consists of linear piecewise segments, seven above and seven below the origin. The segment just above and the segment just below the origin consists of two linear segments. Counting the collinear elements by the origin, there are 16 segments. Each segment has 16 8-bit PCM codes assigned. These are the codewords that identify the voltage level of a sample at some moment in time. Each codeword, often called a PCM "word", consists of 8 bits. The first bit tells the receiver if the sample is a positive or negative voltage. We can see that all PCM words above the origin start with a binary 1, and those below the origin start with a binary 0. The next 3 bits in sequence identify the segment. There are eight segments above the origin and eight below the origin. The last 4 bits, shown as XXXX, indicate exactly where in a particular segment that voltage line is located. The second is called u-law. It follows the logarithmic formula listed here with u equals to 100. The North American T1 system uses the u-law quantization and coding process. The process is similar to that of A-law. Colin Yao Sales Manager Fiber Optics For Sale Co. 1532 Centre Pointe Dr. Milpitas, CA 95035 Web: http://www.fo4sale.com
https://wn.com/What_Is_Pulse_Code_Modulation_(Pcm)
Information Theory And Coding - Convolutional Codes

Information Theory And Coding - Convolutional Codes

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  • Duration: 13:42
  • Updated: 08 Dec 2015
  • views: 36430
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Information Theory And Coding.
https://wn.com/Information_Theory_And_Coding_Convolutional_Codes
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